Archivo de la etiqueta: art

Financial institutions will be crucial to make the shift to circularity, ensuring the consumption and production patterns of the businesses they invest in making more efficient use of resources and minimize waste, pollution and carbon emissions. This is the conclusion of the United Nations Environment Programme report Financing Circularity: Demystifying Finance for the Circular Economy which outlines how financial institutions can help redesign global economies by changing the way we consume and produce.

The move to circular economies could generate USD 4.5 trillion in annual economic output by 2030 while helping to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, protect the health of our ecosystems and enable sustainable recovery in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Banks, insurers and investors can play a critical role by providing businesses with financial products that contribute to the circular economy, conserve natural resources and avoid or reduce waste. Financial institutions currently lack awareness of circularity as well as the expertise, products and services to harness business opportunities.

The growth of circular business models will require structural and technological change, including innovation in the design and manufacturing of products and services; reducing inputs to agriculture; cutting food waste and using digital technologies to increase transparency and sustainability in supply chains. The financial institutions surveyed for the report recognized that there are opportunities to boost circularity in the buildings and construction, food and agriculture, chemicals and electronics sectors in particular. The report explores transitions already underway in these sectors, as well as in manufacturing, apparel and fashion, mining and energy and cross-cutting innovation in areas such as digital technology.

The report highlights examples of innovation in financing circularity using examples from banks, insurers and investors. It also identifies the need for governments to provide the financial sector with incentives and an enabling policy and legislative framework to accelerate the integration of circularity into financial products and services and provides recommendations for policymakers, financial industry regulators and supervisors.

World Food Day, which falls on 16 October, is an opportunity to reassess how humanity produces, distributes and consumes food. Are we doing those things in a sustainable way that benefits farmers, the environment and society at large? What is the impact of food systems on nature? Are we properly valuing biodiversity in agricultural areas? We put some of those questions to Salman Hussain. He is the coordinator of a six-year-old initiative from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) called the Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for Agriculture and Food. Its goal is to help countries understand the true cost of their food systems. UNEP: We hear a lot about the need to do agriculture differently. Why is this? Salman Hussain: Agriculture brings myriad positive and negative externalities, that is, costs or benefits that are externalized to third parties. Examples of negative externalities include the pollution of water bodies from nitrate leaching and human health impacts, such as pesticide poisoning. On the other hand, positive externalities from farming, such as community cohesion and the maintenance of livelihoods for smallholder farmers, are often undervalued. Some of these benefits simply do not get included in economic decision making. We need to account for positive and negative externalities otherwise we are not paying the true cost for our food. UNEP: What does TEEB do? SH: UNEP hosts TEEB, a global initiative focused on making nature’s values visible. TEEB for Agriculture and Food (also known as TEEBAgriFood) was launched in 2014 to make the dependencies and impacts that the agri-food value chain has on nature visible to decision makers. Our mission is to examine the true costs of agriculture.
Farm
Photo: Unsplash/Annie Spratt 
UNEP: Are you involved in any country-based initiatives? SH: Yes. We have an International Climate Initiative-funded project in Colombia, Kenya, Tanzania and Thailand. The aim of the project is to catalyse policy reforms that integrate the often economically invisible values of biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes. Another European Union-funded project focuses on Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico and Thailand. It is seeking to make nature’s values for food and farming visible and promote a sustainable food system that safeguards biodiversity and ecosystem services. UNEP: How has TEEB helped move the needle on sustainable agriculture recently? SH: An example is Indonesia, where the interim TEEBAgriFood report contributed to the inclusion – for the first time – of agroforestry in the [country’s] five-year development plan. What the Ministry of Planning found useful is that we made the economic case for agroforestry. We are now looking to build upon this inclusion in the development plan by working with stakeholders to develop viable scenarios for cacao agroforestry that support livelihoods as well as contribute to conservation outcomes. The TEEBAgriFood Framework we applied in Indonesia, which we are applying in all our country applications, won the World Future Council Vision Award in 2018. UNEP: Who else are you partnering with? SH: Recently TEEB has worked with the Global Alliance for the Future of Food and the Institute for the Development of Environmental-Economic Accounting to produce The TEEBAgriFood Evaluation Framework: Overarching Implementation Guidance. Launched on 29 September, it’s a step-by-step guide to assess how food systems impact people, society, the environment and natural resources. Supported by case studies, the guidance enables users to identify a range of actions that can transform how food systems operate and, simultaneously, helps to create a practical roadmap for action on biodiversity loss.

World Food Day on 16 October calls for global solidarity to help all populations, and especially the most vulnerable, to recover from COVID-19. We asked Marieta Sakalian, a food systems and biodiversity expert with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), why agroecology is relevant to this call.

 

[UNEP] What is agroecology?

[Marieta Sakalian] Agroecology is an ecological approach to agriculture, often described as low-external-input farming. Other terms such as regenerative agriculture or eco-agriculture are also used. Agroecology is not just a set of agricultural practices – it focuses on changing social relations, empowering farmers, adding value locally and privileging short value chains. It allows farmers to adapt to climate change, sustainably use and conserve natural resources and biodiversity.

[UNEP] Why is conserving crop and animal diversity important for our health?

[MS] We need to grow a variety of food to nourish people and sustain the planet, but over the last 100 years, more than 90 per cent of crop varieties have disappeared. Half of the breeds of many domestic animals have been lost. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), only nine plant species account for 66 per cent of total crop production, despite the fact that there are at least 30,000 edible plants.

Losing diversity in our diets is directly linked to health risk factors, such as diabetes, obesity, and malnutrition. Developing and encouraging agroecological farming techniques can help make soils more productive, minimize the use of agrochemicals and pollution, and enhance crop diversity. This in turn can make agriculture more resilient.

[UNEP] What has UNEP been doing to promote agroecology?

[MS] In April 2018, FAO, supported by UNEP and other United Nations partners, launched the Scaling Up Agroecology Initiative, which works with food producers, governments and other stakeholders to promote agroecology. Globally, the initiative is demonstrating how agroecological systems are vital not only for addressing poverty, hunger, and climate change mitigation and adaptation but also for directly realizing 12 of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals in areas such as health, education, gender, water, energy and economic growth. One successful example is the zero-budget natural farming project in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India, supported by UNEP.

Man watering crops
Photo by Axel Fassio/CIFOR

The agroecology “movement” has been around for decades but it’s only in the past few years that it has gained international momentum. What has changed?

[MS] The biodiversity and climate crises have renewed focus on agroecology, which adopts a more holistic, nature-based approach to agriculture. Agriculture is responsible for about 20 per cent of global greenhouse gases – we need to find different approaches to how we produce food, if we are to meet our climate goals. Species losses have also been unprecedented over the past 50 years. This has prompted a growing awareness, for example, of the economic value of pollinators – not just bees, but a whole host of other animals. Attitudes to the way we do farming are changing, and COVID-19 may be speeding up the process.

[UNEP] Why is this approach relevant to food security?

[MS] By 2050, our planet will need to feed close to 10 billion people. It is vital that we transform our agricultural and food systems so they work with and not against nature. As more people go hungry and malnutrition persists, we need to transform the way we do agriculture to achieve Zero Hunger by 2030. Agroecology focuses on ecosystem-based approaches which can galvanize agricultural production systems while helping to boost human well-being, tackle climate change and protect our living planet. But, for agroecology to be adopted at scale, it would need strong backing from policymakers.

[UNEP] What are the challenges in implementing an agroecological approach to farming across the world?

[MS] Education and finance are hurdles. In some countries, awareness of the benefits of this approach is limited and many farmers are conservative: having invested in machinery to do agriculture in a certain way they may be reluctant to change – especially without financial incentives.

 

Read more about UNEP’s work on agriculture, biodiversity and food security: 

The United Nations Environment Assembly resolution, Innovation on biodiversity and land degradation, encourages Member States to step up their efforts to prevent the loss of biological diversity and the degradation of land and soil.

Biodiversity for Food and Nutrition—a joint programme with Bioversity International, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and the governments of Brazil, Kenya, Sri Lanka and Turkey

Mainstreaming Biodiversity in Production Landscapes—a 2018 report funded by the Global Environment Facility

UN Environment’s TEEBAgriFood initiative

Support for National Biodiversity Strategic Action Plans

The UN Biodiversity Lab sponsored by the United Nations Development Programme, UNEP and the World Conservation Monitoring Centre provides high-quality spatial data for national reporting against global biodiversity commitments.

A January 2019 UNEP brief, We are losing the “little things” that run the world, highlights the importance of insects for ecosystems and sustainable food production.

Millions of used cars, vans and minibuses exported from Europe, the USA and Japan to low- and middle-income countries are hindering efforts to combat climate change. They are contributing to air pollution and are often involved in road accidents. Many of them are of poor quality and would fail road-worthiness tests in the exporting countries.

A landmark, first-of-its-kind United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) report, to be released on 26 October 2020, looks at 146 countries that import used vehicles, and calls for action to regulate the trade through the adoption of a set of harmonized minimum quality standards. These would ensure used vehicles contribute to cleaner and safer fleets in recipient countries. UNEP and partners will address these issues, initially with a project focused on Africa.

Despite representing less than 1% of the world’s ocean surface, the Mediterranean Sea is home to up to 18% of the planet’s marine species. The decline of Posidonia Oceanica (an endemic seagrass species known as the “lungs of the Mediterranean”), overfishing, non-indigenous species are among the symptoms of environmental degradation. Marine and coastal ecosystems are reeling under pressure from the unsustainable pursuit of economic growth. This pressure is illustrated by the challenges of marine litter and pollution and further compounded by the rising impacts of climate change. A United Nations Environment Programme Mediterranean Action Plan (UNEP/MAP) report produced by Plan Bleu, a UNEP/MAP Regional Activity Centre, provides the most comprehensive assessment of the state of the environment and development in the region and includes a set of key messages that can inform an adequate policy response. The report was prepared under the Barcelona Convention, the Contracting Parties of which are 21 Mediterranean countries and the European Union.

Rice is a staple for more than 3.5 billion people, including most of the world’s poor. But it can be a problematic crop to farm. It requires massive amounts of water and the paddies in which it grows emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

To tackle such issues, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has been working with the Shanghai Agrobiological Gene Center to develop strains of rice that are drought resistant and don’t need to be planted in paddies. The research, say, experts, could help bolster food security at a time when COVID-19 is threatening to propel more people into hunger.

The study, which runs from 2017 to 2021, is funded by the Government of China and falls under the China-Africa South-South Cooperation arrangement.

“China has lots of experience growing rice and this collaboration with China is a first,” says UNEP ecosystems expert Levis Kavagi, who has been closely involved with the project.

Researchers have developed and tested over 50 varieties of rice in Ghana, Kenya and Uganda. They evaluated how the grains grow at different elevations and, importantly, how they taste.

One strain, dubbed WDR 73 by scientists, proved particularly promising. During trials in Uganda, researchers found that it helped boost yields by about 30 per cent compared to locally grown varieties.

WDR 73 also doesn’t need to be planted in a flooded paddy. That’s important for several reasons.

Transporting seedlings into flooded fields is a laborious process. Paddies are breeding grounds for malaria-carrying mosquitoes. Water shortages, sparked by climate change, are expected to make filling paddies a challenge in many countries. And paddies themselves vent massive amounts of methane –  up to 20 per cent of human-related emissions of the greenhouse gas, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Growing rice on relatively dry land also reduces the ever-growing quest to open up wetlands, havens for birds and other animals, to farming.

“Usually the most suitable land for growing rice also tends to be next to, or in, wetlands or flood plains,” says Kavagi. “Expanding agricultural land involves draining the wetlands. This leads to loss of biodiversity, and reduced water purification and climate regulation services provided by wetlands.”

The ultimate goal of the project is to get a national certification of WDR 73, allowing it to be broadly disseminated to farmers. The project is part of a larger effort by China, African countries and UNEP to develop better rice varieties, improve livelihoods and bolster food security.

«The project shows that with new rice varieties it is possible to achieve the multiple objectives of food security, biodiversity and nature conservation – and fight against climate change,” says Kavagi.

Technical details of rice trials in Ghana, Kenya and Uganda

In Kenya, trials were conducted over three growing seasons in Mwea (central Kenya), Busia (western), and Mtwapa (coastal area). Rice variety WDR 73 performed well compared with the local Basmati varieties. The growth duration varied from 125 days in Mtwapa, to 150 days in Mwea and Busia, where the altitude is over 1,000m. Average grain yield was 5.1 to 9.0 tonnes per hectare. Plant height was 100-110 cm, which shows that this variety is tolerant to rice blast disease and displays good drought-resistant qualities compared to Basmati varieties.

In Uganda, WDR73 cultivation experiments were conducted in Lukaya, Luweero and Arua. In well-managed farms, grain yield increased from 4.35 to more than 6.0 tons per hectare. In Arua, in 2019 the rain-fed crop was direct sowed from 25-30 August and harvested from 30 November to 5 December. The growth duration was 90-95 days and yielded 4.35 tonnes per hectare. Direct seeded WDR 73 grain yield in Luweero in 2019 varied from 6 tonnes per hectare in rain-fed conditions to 8 tonnes per hectare in irrigated paddy fields.

In Bolgatanga, a drought-prone area in northern Ghana, WDR 73 growth duration was 105 days and plant height 110-120 cm, while the grain yield was 6.0 tonnes per hectare.

Industrialized farming has been a reliable way to produce lots of food, at a relatively low cost. But it’s not the bargain it was once believed to be. Unsustainable agriculture can pollute water, air and soil; is a source of greenhouse gas; and destroys wildlife – an environmental cost equivalent to about US$3 trillion every year. The use of chemicals and antimicrobials can have adverse health effects and lead to resistant infections. And to top it all off, our production and consumption habits have been linked to the emergence of zoonotic diseases, such as COVID-19.

To mark World Food Day on 16 October, we take a closer look at sustainable agriculture – how it can help reduce our environmental footprint, improve our health and even create jobs.

What exactly is sustainable agriculture?

It is farming that meets the needs of existing and future generations, while also ensuring profitability, environmental health and social and economic equity. It favours techniques that emulate nature–to preserve soil fertility, prevent water pollution and protect biodiversity. It is also a way to support the achievement of global objectives, like the Sustainable Development Goals and Zero Hunger.

Does sustainable agriculture really make a difference to the environment?

Yes. It uses up to 56 per cent less energy per unit of crops produced, creates 64 per cent fewer greenhouse gas emissions per hectare and supports greater levels of biodiversity than conventional farming.

Woman harvesting cocoa
2019 Young Champion of the Earth for Asia and the Pacific, Louise Mabulo hopes to educate local farmers in the Philippines so that they can live a better quality of life. Photo: UNEP

Why does sustainably produced food seem more expensive?

It may be more costly because it is more labour-intensive. It is often certified in a way that requires it to be separated from conventional foods during processing and transport. The costs associated with marketing and distribution of relatively small volumes of product are often comparatively high. And, sometimes, the supply of certain sustainably produced foods is limited.

Why are some foods so much more affordable–even when they require processing and packaging?

The heavy use of chemicals, medicines and genetic modification allows some foods to be produced cheaply and in reliably high volumes, so the retail price tag may be lower. But this is deceiving because it does not reflect the costs of environmental damage or the price of healthcare that is required to treat diet-related diseases. Ultra-processed foods are often high in energy and low in nutrients and may contribute to the development of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and some forms of cancer. This is particularly concerning amid the COVID-19 pandemic; the disease is especially risky for those with pre-existing health problems.

Consumers may not realize how their dietary choices affect the environment or even their own health. In the absence of either legal obligation or consumer demand, there is little incentive for producers to change their approach.

Do we all have to be vegan?

No. But most of us should eat less animal protein. Livestock production is a major cause of climate change and in most parts of the world, people already consume more animal-sourced food than is healthy. But even small dietary shifts can have a positive impact. The average person consumes 100 grams of meat daily.  Reducing that by 10 grams could improve human health while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Is sustainable agriculture possible in developing countries?

Yes. Because sustainably produced food is typically more labour-intensive than conventionally made food, it has the potential to create 30 per cent more jobs. And because it can command higher prices, it can also generate more money for farmers.

Is it possible to make sustainably produced food that is affordable for everyone?

Yes. As demand for certain foods increases, the costs associated with production, processing, distribution and marketing will drop, which should make them less expensive for consumers.  Policymakers can also play a role, facilitating market access and leveling the financial and regulatory playing field.

Farm
Farmers in Shagra B area of Sudan’s North Darfur State have been able to improve their livelihoods by selling produce at the local market. Photo: UNEP

If it is so important, why hasn’t sustainable farming been adopted as a global standard?

There is a lack of understanding of the way that agriculture, the environment and human health intersect. Policymakers do not typically consider nature as a form of capital, so legislation is not designed to prevent pollution and other kinds of environmental degradation. And consumers may not realize how their dietary choices affect the environment or even their own health. In the absence of either legal obligations or consumer demand, there is little incentive for producers to change their approach.

What are some ways to consume food more sustainably?

Diversify your diet and cook more meals at home. Eat more plant-based foods; enjoy pulses, peas, beans and chickpeas as sources of protein. Eat local, seasonal foods. Purchase sustainably produced foods and learn more about farming practices and labeling. Avoid excessive packaging, which is likely to end up as landfill. Don’t waste food: eliminating food waste could reduce global carbon emissions by 8-10 per cent. Cultivate your own garden, even if it is a small one in your kitchen. Support organizations, policies and projects that promote sustainable food systems. And discuss the importance of healthy and sustainable foods with producers, vendors, policymakers, friends and family.

 

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) supports a transition toward global food systems that provide net-positive impacts on nutrition, the environment and farmer livelihoods. Contributing to the One Planet Network Sustainable Food Systems Programme, UNEP has led the development of a guideline for collaborative policymaking and improved governance.

UNEP is also the custodian of the food waste element of Sustainable Development Goal 12.3, which commits member states to halve their per capita food waste at the consumer retail level. Developing the Food Waste Index, UNEP is currently conducting global modelling of food waste data and preparing a harmonized methodology that will enable countries to track progress towards Goal 12.3.

In Chiang Rai, Thailand, a city perched on the banks of the Mekong River, a group of some 90 residents and university students came together to pick up trash on 19 September.

Like millions of others, they were marking World Cleanup Day, an annual event that encourages communities to tidy up litter from rivers, beaches, cities and even the seafloor.

But the Chiang Rai event was a little different from most others. The waste collected at this clean-up was not only destined for a proper disposal facility, it was also earmarked for a database. Volunteers noted the type and location of waste they found during the cleanup, which was organized by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and Trash Hero Chiang Rai, a conservation group.

This data will be fed into UNEP’s CounterMEASURE project, whose goal is to determine the origins and pathways of plastic waste in major rivers in Asia and provide governments with bespoke policy recommendations to help beat plastic pollution.

“Our goal is to have a scientific understanding for how plastic gets into rivers, and eventually, into the ocean,” said Kakuko Nagatani-Yoshida, UNEP’s Regional Coordinator for Chemicals, Waste and Air Quality in Asia and the Pacific. “With this knowledge, we can recommend policies to governments and help target behavioural change in a more effective way.”

Rivers deposit millions of tons of plastic into the world’s oceans every year. Up to 95 per cent of that pollution comes from only 10 waterways, eight of which are in Asia.

Scientists know little about when and where plastic waste enters these river systems. The first phase of the CounterMEASURE project, completed in May of 2019, used novel technologies, like drones and machine learning, to identify the sources of plastic pollution in the Mekong and Ganges rivers. Among other findings, the project determined that the type and quantity of plastic pollution varied along the length of the river. In Chiang Rai, for example, flowerpots comprised a large proportion of the plastic waste due to the locality’s flower festival.

A second phase, now underway, is bringing the techniques and know-how to other countries, including Sri Lanka and Myanmar. Project leaders will also launch public awareness campaigns in the Mekong and Ganges regions to drive down plastic pollution.

Clean up
Scientists know little about when and where plastic waste enters the river systems of Asia. Photo: Rajitha Athukorala

The cleanup in Chiang Rai provided an opportunity to gather data while engaging the local community in citizen science, said Panate Manomaivibool, the Head of the Circular Economy for Waste-free Thailand Research Center at Mae Fah Luang University.

“It does not only help people to see the problem firsthand but also enables them to see how they can be part of the solution,” said Manomaivibool, who helped organize the cleanup. “We have a long way to go to fix the plastic pollution problem and communities need to be part of that.”

Volunteers collected 39 bags of waste, weighing over 90 kilograms. Meanwhile, the Geoinformatics Center (GIC) at the Asian Institute of Technology, a CounterMEASURE partner, conducted a drone survey to augment the data. The GIC team also trained cleanup crews to use a waste survey app designed for the CounterMEASURE project in order to amass further data after the event.

“What better way to gather the data we need than by engaging the communities who stand to benefit from the project,” said Nagatani-Yoshida. “These cleanups help beautify the area, but by contributing data to the project, the benefits are amplified many times over.”

The UN Environment Programme Finance Initiative (UNEP FI) saw more than 2500 participants join Day 1 of its 16th Global Roundtable, held virtually for the first time ever from 13–14 October 2020, under the theme “Financing a Resilient Future”. Below are highlights of the keynotes delivered.

 

Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary General, United Nations, gave the opening keynote address by reminding participants that sustainable finance wields an enormous opportunity to transform our markets, businesses, societies and environment.

Kristalina Georgieva, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), outlined the needs to have policies to mobilise financial resources for the green transformation that is so urgently needed and build forward low-carbon, climate-resilient economies.

 

Mark Carney, UN Special Envoy on Climate Action and Finance, emphasised the importance of financial institutions in managing the risk and seizing the opportunities in tackling climate change across all sectors of the economy and mainstream finance. He also called for banks to link executive pay to the goals of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

Christiana Figueres, Convenor of Mission2020, pointed out that where finance goes, so go emissions, or emission reductions. She said efforts to decarbonize are about managing financial risk, increasing financial stability in the medium and long-term and ultimately it is about prosperity.

 

David Blood, Co-founder and Senior Partner, Generation Investment Management, explained that the next 10 years will be the most critical for the future of the planet and humanity and that to meet global environmental and social goals, businesses and investors must take responsibility for the impact of their decisions on the world.

Johan Rockström, Director, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research told delegates that planetary boundaries provide a scientific target for a safe operating space, with science able to provide the guardrails for sustainable financial sector investment.

A full recap of the event can be found here.

World Food Day on 16 October calls for global solidarity to help all populations, and especially the most vulnerable, to recover from COVID-19. We asked Marieta Sakalian, a food systems and biodiversity expert with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), why agroecology is relevant to this call.

 

[UNEP] What is agroecology?

[Marieta Sakalian] Agroecology is an ecological approach to agriculture, often described as low-external-input farming. Other terms such as regenerative agriculture or eco-agriculture are also used. Agroecology is not just a set of agricultural practices – it focuses on changing social relations, empowering farmers, adding value locally and privileging short value chains. It allows farmers to adapt to climate change, sustainably use and conserve natural resources and biodiversity.

[UNEP] Why is conserving crop and animal diversity important for our health?

[MS] We need to grow a variety of food to nourish people and sustain the planet, but over the last 100 years, more than 90 per cent of crop varieties have disappeared. Half of the breeds of many domestic animals have been lost. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), only nine plant species account for 66 per cent of total crop production, despite the fact that there are at least 30,000 edible plants.

Losing diversity in our diets is directly linked to health risk factors, such as diabetes, obesity, and malnutrition. Developing and encouraging agroecological farming techniques can help make soils more productive, minimize the use of agrochemicals and pollution, and enhance crop diversity. This in turn can make agriculture more resilient.

[UNEP] What has UNEP been doing to promote agroecology?

[MS] In April 2018, FAO, supported by UNEP and other United Nations partners, launched the Scaling Up Agroecology Initiative, which works with food producers, governments and other stakeholders to promote agroecology. Globally, the initiative is demonstrating how agroecological systems are vital not only for addressing poverty, hunger, and climate change mitigation and adaptation but also for directly realizing 12 of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals in areas such as health, education, gender, water, energy and economic growth. One successful example is the zero-budget natural farming project in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India, supported by UNEP.

Man watering crops
Photo by Axel Fassio/CIFOR

The agroecology “movement” has been around for decades but it’s only in the past few years that it has gained international momentum. What has changed?

[MS] The biodiversity and climate crises have renewed focus on agroecology, which adopts a more holistic, nature-based approach to agriculture. Agriculture is responsible for about 20 per cent of global greenhouse gases – we need to find different approaches to how we produce food, if we are to meet our climate goals. Species losses have also been unprecedented over the past 50 years. This has prompted a growing awareness, for example, of the economic value of pollinators – not just bees, but a whole host of other animals. Attitudes to the way we do farming are changing, and COVID-19 may be speeding up the process.

[UNEP] Why is this approach relevant to food security?

[MS] By 2050, our planet will need to feed close to 10 billion people. It is vital that we transform our agricultural and food systems so they work with and not against nature. As more people go hungry and malnutrition persists, we need to transform the way we do agriculture to achieve Zero Hunger by 2030. Agroecology focuses on ecosystem-based approaches which can galvanize agricultural production systems while helping to boost human well-being, tackle climate change and protect our living planet. But, for agroecology to be adopted at scale, it would need strong backing from policymakers.

[UNEP] What are the challenges in implementing an agroecological approach to farming across the world?

[MS] Education and finance are hurdles. In some countries, awareness of the benefits of this approach is limited and many farmers are conservative: having invested in machinery to do agriculture in a certain way they may be reluctant to change – especially without financial incentives.

 

Read more about UNEP’s work on agriculture, biodiversity and food security: 

The United Nations Environment Assembly resolution, Innovation on biodiversity and land degradation, encourages Member States to step up their efforts to prevent the loss of biological diversity and the degradation of land and soil.

Biodiversity for Food and Nutrition—a joint programme with Bioversity International, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and the governments of Brazil, Kenya, Sri Lanka and Turkey

Mainstreaming Biodiversity in Production Landscapes—a 2018 report funded by the Global Environment Facility

UN Environment’s TEEBAgriFood initiative

Support for National Biodiversity Strategic Action Plans

The UN Biodiversity Lab sponsored by the United Nations Development Programme, UNEP and the World Conservation Monitoring Centre provides high-quality spatial data for national reporting against global biodiversity commitments.

A January 2019 UNEP brief, We are losing the “little things” that run the world, highlights the importance of insects for ecosystems and sustainable food production.

 

For more information, please contact Marieta Sakalian: Marieta.Sakalian@un.org or James Lomax: James.Lomax@un.org

World Food Day, which falls on 16 October, is an opportunity to reassess how humanity produces, distributes and consumes food. Are we doing those things in a sustainable way that benefits farmers, the environment and society at large? What is the impact of food systems on nature? Are we properly valuing biodiversity in agricultural areas?

We put some of those questions to Salman Hussain. He is the coordinator of a six-year-old initiative from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) called the Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for Agriculture and Food. Its goal is to help countries understand the true cost of their food systems.

UNEP: We hear a lot about the need to do agriculture differently. Why is this?

Salman Hussain: Agriculture brings myriad positive and negative externalities, that is, costs or benefits that are externalized to third parties. Examples of negative externalities include the pollution of water bodies from nitrate leaching and human health impacts, such as pesticide poisoning. On the other hand, positive externalities from farming, such as community cohesion and the maintenance of livelihoods for smallholder farmers, are often undervalued. Some of these benefits simply do not get included in economic decision making. We need to account for positive and negative externalities otherwise we are not paying the true cost for our food.

UNEP: What does TEEB do?

SH: UNEP hosts TEEB, a global initiative focused on making nature’s values visible. TEEB for Agriculture and Food (also known as TEEBAgriFood) was launched in 2014 to make the dependencies and impacts that the agri-food value chain has on nature visible to decision makers. Our mission is to examine the true costs of agriculture.

Farm
Photo: Unsplash/Annie Spratt 

UNEP: Are you involved in any country-based initiatives?

SH: Yes. We have an International Climate Initiative-funded project in Colombia, Kenya, Tanzania and Thailand. The aim of the project is to catalyse policy reforms that integrate the often economically invisible values of biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes.

Another European Union-funded project focuses on Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico and Thailand. It is seeking to make nature’s values for food and farming visible and promote a sustainable food system that safeguards biodiversity and ecosystem services.

UNEP: How has TEEB helped move the needle on sustainable agriculture recently?

SH: An example is Indonesia, where the interim TEEBAgriFood report contributed to the inclusion – for the first time – of agroforestry in the [country’s] five-year development plan. What the Ministry of Planning found useful is that we made the economic case for agroforestry. We are now looking to build upon this inclusion in the development plan by working with stakeholders to develop viable scenarios for cacao agroforestry that support livelihoods as well as contribute to conservation outcomes.

The TEEBAgriFood Framework we applied in Indonesia, which we are applying in all our country applications, won the World Future Council Vision Award in 2018.

UNEP: Who else are you partnering with?

SH: Recently TEEB has worked with the Global Alliance for the Future of Food and the Institute for the Development of Environmental-Economic Accounting to produce The TEEBAgriFood Evaluation Framework: Overarching Implementation Guidance. Launched on 29 September, it’s a step-by-step guide to assess how food systems impact people, society, the environment and natural resources. Supported by case studies, the guidance enables users to identify a range of actions that can transform how food systems operate and, simultaneously, helps to create a practical roadmap for action on biodiversity loss.

 

For more information, please contact Salman Hussain: Salman.Hussain@un.org

Un sistema diseñado por un estudiante de la Universidad de Guanajuato para aumentar la eficiencia en la producción de energía solar fotovoltaica recibió el 30 de septiembre el premio al primer lugar del concurso Innovación para los estilos de vida sostenibles en México, organizado por el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) con el apoyo de la Comisión Europea.

El paquete tecnológico “Repsun”, ideado por el estudiante de ingeniería química José Ramiro Fuentes Lara, consiste en un sistema de control inteligente y una celda fotosensible que contribuyen a determinar la posición exacta del sol durante el día con el fin de aprovechar la posición óptima para la producción de energía. El sistema permite aumentar 30% la generación energética de los equipos de energía solar fotovoltaica.

El concurso Innovación para los estilos de vida sostenibles en México es parte de una iniciativa regional que también se está ejecutando en Colombia y Costa Rica, en la cual han participado alrededor de 1.000 universitarios, con la expectativa de expandir la competencia a otros países.

Fuentes Lara, y los ganadores de las otras dos ediciones del concurso, recibirán US$3.000 en asistencia técnica para ejecutar sus proyectos y participarán en un campamento virtual organizado por el Centro de Emprendimiento de la Universidad de los Andes, en Colombia, donde expertos en ecoinnovación les ayudarán en la implementación de sus ideas.

El concurso en México recibió 50 propuestas de más de 100 estudiantes de licenciaturas y posgrados en 20 universidades. Un panel de expertos evaluó los proyectos, entre los cuales se incluyeron iniciativas como campañas de comunicación, bocetos de patentes, propuestas de ley y prototipos tecnológicos.

Dos propuestas para impulsar el consumo sostenible de alimentos, y reducir y mejorar la gestión de residuos sólidos recibieron el segundo y el tercer lugar del concurso, respectivamente.

El proyecto “Cultivando sonrisas” de Andrea Mora Cruz, de la Universidad de las Américas Puebla, consiste en un plan para implementar huertos escolares en tres escuelas primarias públicas de San Bernardino Tlaxcalancingo, Puebla, con el fin de promover una alimentación saludable que contribuya a la protección del suelo y del medio ambiente.

“Viva verde”, de José Andrés Valencia Espinosa y Alma Lisset Ruíz Aguilar, estudiantes de la Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, es una estrategia de gestión residuos sólidos para impulsar la reducción, reutilización y reciclaje de desechos en las instalaciones de la Facultad de Ciencias de dicha casa de estudios.

“Los ganadores son todos los jóvenes que participaron. Son ganadores porque creen en el cambio y no solo creen, sino que actúan para generarlo”, dijo durante el evento la coordinadora regional de Eficiencia de Recursos del PNUMA en América Latina y el Caribe, Adriana Zacarías Farah.

La selección de los ganadores estuvo a cargo de un jurado compuesto por la representante del PNUMA en México, Dolores Barrientos Alemán, el director de Producción y Consumo Sustentable de Actividades Industriales de la Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales de México, Eduardo Garza Pasalagua, el director de Normalización para la Industria Alimentaria y Medio Ambiente en la Secretaría de Economía, Cesar Orozco Arce, y el director de Relaciones Institucionales de la empresa privada Promotora Ambiental, Carlos Gómez Flores.

Los tres galardonados presentaron sus proyectos este jueves durante una ceremonia de premiación en línea en el cual ofreció un concierto la banda musical Relicario y se presentó una interpretación artística del grupo teatral Hekatombe.

El concurso busca estimular el desarrollo de iniciativas que favorezcan el consumo y la producción sostenibles, y alentar a jóvenes emprendedores a desarrollar ideas comerciales que contribuyan a la recuperación económica pos-COVID-19.

La iniciativa es parte del proyecto Impulsando el Consumo Sostenible en América Latina y el Caribe (ICSAL) que trabaja con gobiernos, empresas y partes interesadas en la implementación de políticas que aumenten la sostenibilidad en el diseño de productos y la información al consumidor. ICSAL es un programa financiado por la Comisión Europea.

Sobre el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente

El Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) es la autoridad ambiental líder en el mundo. Proporciona liderazgo y alienta el trabajo conjunto en el cuidado del medio ambiente, inspirando, informando y capacitando a las naciones y a los pueblos para mejorar su calidad de vida sin comprometer la de las futuras generaciones.

Para más información, por favor contacte a:

Unidad Regional de Comunicación para América Latina y el Caribe, PNUMA, noticias@pnuma.org.

  • La XXII Reunión del Foro de Ministros de Medio Ambiente de América Latina y el Caribe es organizada por el Gobierno de Barbados a través de su Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Embellecimiento Nacional, en colaboración con el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente.
  • El encuentro se realizará en formato virtual por primera vez desde la creación de este organismo, que convoca a los 33 ministros de medio ambiente de la región.

Panamá, 8 de octubre de 2020.- La XXII Reunión del Foro de Ministros de Medio Ambiente de América Latina y el Caribe se llevará a cabo del 18 al 19 de enero de 2021 con el fin de abordar los desafíos ambientales más apremiantes de la región, oportunidades para la recuperación sostenible y acciones urgentes en favor de la naturaleza para lograr los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible.

En el contexto de la pandemia de COVID-19 y las restricciones vigentes para evitar una mayor transmisión de la enfermedad, el encuentro regional se celebrará por primera vez en un formato virtual. La reunión es organizada por el Gobierno de Barbados, actual presidente del foro, y la Oficina Regional para América Latina y el Caribe del Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA).

«Esta pandemia ha demostrado que el equilibrio de nuestros ecosistemas se ve afectado por la forma en que usamos nuestros recursos naturales. Aún estamos a tiempo de construir un futuro sostenible para América Latina y el Caribe, y hago un llamado a los ministros de la región para que apoyen los compromisos audaces que necesitamos para garantizar precisamente eso», dijo el ministro de Medio Ambiente y Embellecimiento Nacional de Barbados, Adrian Forde.

Los ministros debatirán temas urgentes para la región, incluida la transición hacia una economía circular, la agenda sobre el cierre de vertederos a cielo abierto, la contaminación del aire, la acción climática, la justicia y la gobernanza ambiental, los vínculos entre género y medio ambiente, el desarrollo sostenible de los pequeños Estados insulares en desarrollo y la importancia de reconstruir mejor y de manera más sostenible a raíz de la pandemia de COVID-19.

La XXII Reunión del Foro también considerará la reestructuración del Comité Técnico Interagencial y un plan de acción de América Latina y el Caribe para la implementación de la Década de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Restauración de los Ecosistemas como dimensiones integrales de la recuperación verde pos-COVID-19.

“El mundo se enfrenta a un momento decisivo. Mientras países de todo el mundo preparan sus planes de recuperación, entramos en una década crucial en la que debemos dar un impulso final para lograr los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible, el Acuerdo de París y un marco de biodiversidad nuevo y ambicioso”, dijo el director regional del PNUMA en América Latina y el Caribe, Leo Heileman.

“Confío en que este encuentro regional será un paso adelante en el camino hacia un futuro más próspero y sostenible”, añadió Heileman.

El Foro de Ministros también preparará las contribuciones de la región al quinto período de sesiones de la Asamblea de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente, que tendrá lugar en 2021. La Asamblea, el máximo órgano ambiental de toma de decisiones ambientales, se reunirá bajo el tema “Fortalecer la acción por la naturaleza para lograr los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible”.

El Foro de Ministros de Medio Ambiente de América Latina y el Caribe se estableció en 1982 y es el organismo de cooperación más antiguo y relevante para las autoridades ambientales de la región.

NOTAS PARA LOS EDITORES

Descargue la agenda preliminar del evento.

Sobre el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente

El Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) es la autoridad ambiental líder en el mundo. Proporciona liderazgo y alienta el trabajo conjunto en el cuidado del medio ambiente, inspirando, informando y capacitando a las naciones y a los pueblos para mejorar su calidad de vida sin comprometer la de las futuras generaciones.

Para más información, por favor contacte a:

María Amparo Lasso, jefa regional de Comunicación, PNUMA. maria.lasso@un.org.

Sequías prolongadas que asolan cultivos, inseguridad alimentaria, incendios e inundaciones devastadoras afectan de forma recurrente el Corredor Seco de Centroamérica y las zonas áridas de República Dominicana. Éste es uno de los lugares del planeta más vulnerables al cambio climático.

El Corredor Seco es una franja que se extiende desde el norte de Centroamérica hasta el oeste de Panamá, principalmente en la vertiente del Pacífico, y donde la época de sequía es más prolongada que en el resto de la región. Aquí, al igual que en República Dominicana, las consecuencias de los fenómenos climáticos se ven exacerbadas por la degradación ambiental y la vulnerabilidad de la población, que vive mayormente en condiciones de pobreza, es fuertemente dependiente de la agricultura y a menudo se ve forzada a migrar debido a estas condiciones.

La transformación del clima global a causa del aumento de las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero sólo promete aumentar la periodicidad e intensidad de los eventos extremos. Según las proyecciones climáticas, para fines de siglo las temperaturas en esta zona subirán 3–3,5°C en un escenario intermedio de reducción de emisiones y 6-7°C en el caso de que la trayectoria actual se mantenga.

La propia naturaleza ofrece soluciones para que las comunidades del Corredor Seco y las zonas áridas de República Dominicana estén mejor preparadas ante los efectos del cambio climático.

Un estudio del Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) encontró que las medidas de adaptación basadas en ecosistemas pueden ayudar a garantizar el acceso al agua para mantener los cultivos todo el año, aumentar la productividad, reducir la inseguridad alimentaria y beneficiar la biodiversidad.

El análisis, elaborado en cooperación con la Comisión Centroamericana de Ambiente y Desarrollo (CCAD) y el Banco Centroamericano de Integración Económica (BCIE), explora el potencial de soluciones basadas en la naturaleza como: conservación y restauración de bosques, sistemas agroforestales y silvopastoriles, irrigación eficiente, cercas vivas, sistemas de recolección de agua de lluvia, cortafuegos para bosques y plantaciones, viveros forestales mixtos y bombas de agua impulsadas por energía solar fotovoltaica.

La conservación y restauración de bosques en la parte alta de las cuencas ayuda a reducir la erosión y regular los caudales. El riego por goteo en los cultivos de hortalizas puede disminuir el consumo de agua hasta 70% para rendir las reservas de agua. Y el cultivo de café con sombra contribuye a aumentar la fertilidad del suelo, mientras amplía el acceso de los agricultores a otros mercados como el de frutas o leña.

“La adaptación al cambio climático en el Corredor Seco de Centroamérica y las zonas áridas de República Dominicana es una cuestión humanitaria que requiere una respuesta urgente, y más ahora que la pandemia ha exacerbado la vulnerabilidad de los más necesitados”, dijo Gustavo Máñez, coordinador regional de Cambio Climático del PNUMA en América Latina y el Caribe.

“Los campesinos de estas tierras no han causado el cambio climático y, sin embargo, están pagando las peores consecuencias. Ahora bien, no hay que buscar las soluciones solamente afuera. La mayor parte de las técnicas para mejorar calidad de vida de las personas y aumentar la productividad de los cultivos se encuentra en la propia naturaleza”, añadió Máñez.

En el Corredor Seco las temperaturas promedio son más altas que en el resto de Centroamérica, las precipitaciones son menores y los períodos de sequía impulsados por el fenómeno de El Niño son frecuentes. De forma similar, las zonas áridas de República Dominicana sufren estos impactos que se agudizan con el cambio climático.

El año pasado, las sequías prolongadas e intensas lluvias destruyeron más de la mitad de las cosechas de maíz y frijoles de los agricultores de subsistencia: 2,2 millones de personas perdieron sus cultivos y 1,4 millones necesitaron asistencia alimentaria urgente, según Naciones Unidas. Este conjunto de factores aumenta el riesgo de la población a padecer hambre y pobreza, que son los principales motores de la migración de centroamericanos hacia Norteamérica.

El agua, fuente de oportunidades

La vertiente del Pacífico alberga las ciudades más pobladas de Centroamérica, es el hogar de 70% de la población de estos países y sin embargo hace uso de sólo 30% del agua disponible debido a la recurrencia de las sequías y la gestión poco eficiente.

A través de una evaluación de vulnerabilidad local, el PNUMA identificó las cuencas con mayor exposición y sensibilidad frente a los efectos del cambio climático y menor capacidad de adaptación en los siete países estudiados.

analisis vulnerabilidad corredor seco mapa
Análisis de vulnerabilidad climática en cuencas de seis países de Centroamérica y República Dominicana. El color celeste representa menor vulnerabilidad al cambio climático y el fucsia mayor vulnerabilidad. (PNUMA)

En total, 36 municipios donde viven 1.157.000 personas fueron priorizados para potenciales intervenciones tras considerar variables como suministro y demanda de agua, situación del agua superficial y subterránea bajo distintos escenarios de aumento de temperatura, dependencia rural, disponibilidad de técnicas de irrigación y acceso a servicios financieros.

Además, se desarrollaron análisis hidrológicos detallados en tres cuencas de Honduras, Costa Rica y República Dominicana con el fin de diseñar acciones de adaptación que puedan ser replicadas en los demás municipios.

“La aplicación de estas medidas ayudaría a capacitar a las autoridades y comunidades respecto a la efectividad de la adaptación basada en ecosistemas. Para implementar estas soluciones, será fundamental ampliar el acceso de los gobiernos locales y agricultores a servicios financieros innovadores como las microfinanzas para promover las soluciones basadas en la naturaleza. En el Corredor Seco, sólo 10% de los pequeños productores tiene acceso a financiamiento”, dijo Gustavo Máñez.

El PNUMA promueve las soluciones basadas en la naturaleza como parte de su programa sobre adaptación al cambio climático y lidera el Decenio de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Restauración de los Ecosistemas 2021-2030 junto con la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Alimentación y la Agricultura.

Un sistema digital que integra la hidroponía y la acuicultura para maximizar el uso de los recursos naturales ganó el primer lugar del concurso Innovación para los estilos de vida sostenibles en Colombia, organizado por el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) y la Universidad de los Andes con el apoyo de la Comisión Europea.

Acuaponía digital para todos” es un diseño de cuatro estudiantes de la Universidad de Popayán que incluye un sistema de recirculación de agua y aprovechamiento de nutrientes para la cría de peces y la producción de vegetales hidropónicos, dentro de un invernadero monitoreado por medio de una aplicación digital.

De acuerdo con los autores del proyecto, su método puede consumir menos de la mitad del agua que se utiliza para la producción de estos alimentos en Colombia y tiene el potencial de mejorar la seguridad alimentaria y los ingresos de poblaciones de escasos recursos.

El concurso Innovación para los estilos de vida sostenibles es parte de una iniciativa regional que se está ejecutando en Colombia, Costa Rica y México, y en la cual han participado alrededor de 1.000 estudiantes de pregrado y postgrado.

Los autores de “Acuaponía digital para todos”, Camila Andrea Benavides Claros, Margie Vanessa Quijano Gutiérrez, Yazmín Adriana Alban Garzón y Edwin Rivera Gómez, se unirán a los ganadores de México y Costa Rica en un campamento virtual organizado por el Centro de Emprendimiento de la Universidad de los Andes, donde expertos en ecoinnovación les ayudarán en la implementación de sus ideas. También recibirán US$3.000 en asistencia técnica para ejecutar su proyecto.

“No podemos seguir creciendo económicamente a costa de la naturaleza. Se necesita un cambio sistémico que solo puede ser factible si como ciudadanos optamos por estilos de vida más sostenibles”, dijo el director de la oficina del PNUMA en Colombia, Juan Bello, durante el evento de premiación.

“Este concurso busca crear un espacio en el que los jóvenes de la región puedan desarrollar soluciones innovadoras de recuperación económica que al mismo tiempo conecten con esos estilos de vida amigables con el medio ambiente”, añadió Bello.

La convocatoria en Colombia recibió propuestas de 59 grupos compuestos por alrededor de 200 estudiantes de 15 universidades del país.

El premio al segundo lugar fue concedido a “La caja del mapa de los sueños” del grupo Zuka Lab de la Universidad de los Andes. Esta herramienta didáctica busca ayudar a las personas a construir proyectos de vida sostenibles. Sus autoras quieren llevar el producto a niños y adolescentes de América Latina para promover la educación ambiental y el consumo consciente.

El tercer lugar fue otorgado a la red de mercadeo “Sublime”, cuyo objetivo es solucionar los problemas de desconexión entre los consumidores urbanos y los campesinos productores de materia prima y artículos procesados. La propuesta de un grupo de estudiantes de la Universidad de los Andes busca apoyar a los agricultores en pequeña escala y ofrecer sus productos a través de una aplicación móvil.

Los tres galardonados presentaron sus proyectos este martes 13 de octubre durante una ceremonia virtual de premiación.

El concurso busca estimular el desarrollo de iniciativas que favorezcan el consumo y la producción sostenibles, y alentar a jóvenes emprendedores a desarrollar ideas comerciales que contribuyan a la recuperación económica pos-COVID-19. Un sistema para maximizar el uso de la tecnología de energía solar ganó el concurso en México el pasado 30 de septiembre y el 15 de octubre se conocerá el proyecto ganador en Costa Rica.

La iniciativa es parte del proyecto Impulsando el Consumo Sostenible en América Latina y el Caribe (ICSAL) que trabaja con gobiernos, empresas y partes interesadas en la implementación de políticas que aumenten la sostenibilidad en el diseño de productos y la información al consumidor. ICSAL es un programa financiado por la Comisión Europea.

Sobre el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente

El Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) es la autoridad ambiental líder en el mundo. Proporciona liderazgo y alienta el trabajo conjunto en el cuidado del medio ambiente, inspirando, informando y capacitando a las naciones y a los pueblos para mejorar su calidad de vida sin comprometer la de las futuras generaciones.

Para más información, por favor contacte a:

Unidad Regional de Comunicación para América Latina y el Caribe, PNUMA, noticias@pnuma.org.

Un proyecto para producir blísteres farmacéuticos biodegradables ganó el primer lugar del concurso Innovación para los estilos de vida sostenibles en Costa Rica, organizado por el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) y el Tecnológico de Costa Rica (TEC) con el apoyo de la Comisión Europea.

Ecoblist” es una lámina de plástico creada a través de polímeros biodegradables con base en almidón de yuca, resistentes al calor y la humedad.  La propuesta, presentada por ocho estudiantes de la Universidad de Costa Rica, pretende contribuir a la reducción de la contaminación por plásticos desechables. Sus autores sostienen que esta fórmula podría tener futuras aplicaciones en el diseño de otros envases plásticos descartables que supongan un problema ambiental.

El concurso Innovación para los estilos de vida sostenibles es parte de una iniciativa regional que se ejecutó en Colombia, Costa Rica y México, y en la cual han participado alrededor de 1.000 estudiantes de pregrado y postgrado.

El equipo de “Ecoblist” recibirá US$3.000 en asistencia técnica para ejecutar su proyecto y participará en un campamento virtual organizado por el Centro de Emprendimiento de la Universidad de los Andes, Colombia, donde expertos en ecoinnovación ayudarán a los ganadores a desarrollar sus ideas.

“Lo que antes era importante, hoy es urgente. Esa es una de las lecciones que nos deja la pandemia. Hoy queda claro que, si queremos resultados positivos duraderos, la recuperación económica pos-COVID-19 debe integrar de manera prioritaria la sostenibilidad ambiental y el bienestar social”, dijo el director regional del Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) en América Latina y el Caribe, Leo Heileman, en el evento virtual de premiación.

“Como Unión Europea (UE), nos complace muchísimo apoyar esta iniciativa. Esto es parte de nuestra prioridad número uno, que es el Pacto Verde. Nuestra acción tanto dentro como fuera de la UE está dirigida a buscar todo lo que pueda conjugar innovación y respeto del medio ambiente. La producción y el consumo sostenible es clave para hacerlo”, dijo el jefe de cooperación de la Unión Europea para Centroamérica, Panamá y Costa Rica, Alberto Menghini.

El concurso es parte del proyecto Impulsando el Consumo Sostenible en América Latina y el Caribe (ICSAL), un programa financiado por la Comisión Europea que trabaja con gobiernos, empresas y partes interesadas en la implementación de políticas que aumenten la sostenibilidad en el diseño de productos, la información al consumidor y la promoción de estilos de vida sostenible.

El premio al segundo lugar en Costa Rica fue concedido a un proyecto que promueve el cultivo de la yaca (Artocarpus heterophyllus) y la producción de sus derivados para ser comercializados como sustitutos de la carne roja, y el tercer lugar fue otorgado a una propuesta de reutilización de residuos de construcción para la fabricación de concretos reciclados. Ambas iniciativas fueron diseñadas por estudiantes del TEC.

“La reactivación económica de la pandemia es una oportunidad para reinventarnos, seguir innovando y aprovechar la tecnología en armonía con el ambiente y la salud de las personas. Las tres ideas ganadoras van esta dirección”, dijo el viceministerio de Energía del Ministerio de Ambiente y Energía de Costa Rica, Rolando Castro.

El concurso recibió 15 propuestas de las cinco universidades públicas de Costa Rica, las cuales fueron previamente expuestas a un jurado de la Red de Educación Ambiental del Consejo Nacional de Rectores (CONARE), que reúne a las casas de estudio públicas del país.

Los tres galardonados presentaron sus proyectos el jueves 15 de octubre durante una ceremonia virtual de premiación en la cual un jurado de alto nivel evaluó las propuestas. Dicho panel estuvo compuesto por Leo Heileman, Alberto Menghini, Rolando Castro, el rector del TEC, Luis Paulino Méndez, y la coordinadora de la carrera de Ingeniería Ambiental del TEC, Ana Lorena Arias.

El concurso busca estimular el desarrollo de iniciativas que favorezcan el consumo y la producción sostenibles, y alentar a jóvenes emprendedores a desarrollar ideas comerciales que contribuyan a la recuperación económica pos-COVID-19. Un sistema para maximizar el uso de la tecnología de energía solar ganó el concurso en México el pasado 30 de septiembre y un emprendimiento digital que integra la hidroponía y la acuicultura fue galardonado en Colombia el 13 de octubre.

Sobre el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente

El Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) es la autoridad ambiental líder en el mundo. Proporciona liderazgo y alienta el trabajo conjunto en el cuidado del medio ambiente, inspirando, informando y capacitando a las naciones y a los pueblos para mejorar su calidad de vida sin comprometer la de las futuras generaciones.

Para más información, por favor contacte a:

Unidad Regional de Comunicación para América Latina y el Caribe, PNUMA, noticias@pnuma.org.

Héctor Joseph Dáger Gaspard, a la edad de 22 años, comenzó a desarrollar su carrera, luego de obtener su título de Abogado en la Universidad Católica Andrés Bello en Caracas, Venezuela.

En 1977, se asoció con el prestigioso abogado, el Dr. Augusto Pérez-Rendiles, fundando su despacho de abogados «Dáger, Pérez-Rendiles». Ambos socios descienden de familias prominentes de la ciudad de Caracas. S Empezaron a representar a algunos bien conocidos privados grupos empresariales del sector y empresas relacionadas, como por ejemplo al Grupo Cisneros, Pepsi Cola, Banco Noroco, Banco Mercantil, Palmito Orinoco, Panel Carabobo, Aserradero el Manteco, Home Depot J Gaspard, Aserradero J Gaspard, Maderas Nurias, J Gaspard Medical, Proyecto y Construcciones, Transporte J. Gaspard, empresas relacionadas a su socio Pérez-¬Rendiles y a esta lista se suma, otras, de clientes variados que atendió en diversos asuntos durante los primeros 10 años de fundado el bufete
En el año 1990, el Dr. Dáger creó su propio despacho de abogados independiente, denominado «Dáger Abogados Consultores». Durante el período comprendido entre los años 1990 y 2004, su despacho de abogados representó a grandes clientes corporativos, entre los cuales destacan: Grupo Covenal Mariara (la empresa local de montaje de vehículos automotores Fiat, Renault y Chevrolet), Grupo Ovejita (empresa de textil), The Cohen Family (propietarios de diversas empresas textiles y de alimentos), Vanadio de Venezuela (minería y producción de estaño), Editorial Armitano y Banco Noroco, F N Herstal, Cristalex (Mineria de Oro), así como un importante número de clientes privados y ocasionales.

Su trabajo con el Banco Noroco, se refiere a la revisión y estructuración de la banca de inversión y las transacciones.

En 1993 el Dr. Hector Dager se asoció con el grupo Noroco bajo el nombre de DAGNOR y crearon la fábrica de Palmitos Orinoco, posteriormente vendió su participación siendo poseedor del 50% de las acciones de la fábrica a sus socios Noroco

En 2004, el Héctor Joseph Dager Gaspard firmó un contrato para representar legalmente a Cimi y Semi, pertenecientes al grupo ACS, una multinacional comercial e industrial española Grupo de construcción y desarrollo de energía que comenzó a hacer negocios en Venezuela bajo sus filiales para la construcción y fabricación de dos sub estaciones eléctricas, así como con Dragados de España perteneciente al mismo grupo ACS e ICA de México, multinacional empresa constructora con sede en Madrid, España, por un proyecto para construir una planta hidroeléctrica en Puerto Ordaz llamado «Caruachi» en el estado de Bolívar, Venezuela. En este punto de su carrera, el Dr. Dager comenzó a desarrollar importantes lazos comerciales con empresas multinacionales de infraestructuras y energía eléctrica.

En noviembre de 2005, el cliente firmó un nuevo contrato (Copy on file) para representar a otro consorcio de empresas constructoras de infraestructuras, está compuesta por grupo Impregilo (Italia), Odebrecht (Brasil) y Vinccler (Vea). El consorcio llamado «Consorcio OIV Tocoma» se adjudicó el contrato para construir 3 kilómetros de ancho presa hidroeléctrica en el Río Caroni en Tocoma, Venezuela para generar una capacidad de 2,160 megavatios de energía eléctrica.
Este proyecto fue presupuestado  y recibió el 75% de su financiación CORPORACIÓN Andina de Fomento (CAF) participando y del Banco

Interamericano de desarrollo (BID) con participación financiera. De la presa la construcción comenzó en marzo de 2007 y el Dr. Dager fue contratado en su fase inicial del 2006 hasta 2010.
Sus servicios jurídicos en este proyecto incluyeron la negociación e intermediación de la financiación durante las diferentes fases de la construcción del proyecto, discusión de modificación de obra, cobranzas de obras terminadas, y todo lo referente a cualquier discusión referente al contrato con su cliente.

Posteriormente se le contrató como empresa independiente para las negociaciones contractuales vinculadas a proveedores de electricidad, maquinaria y equipo. Los proveedores eran General Electric, Alstom, Siemens, Sumitomo HiTachi, Mitsui, VATECH y Harbing.
Entre el 2002 y el 2015, el Dr. Dager ha asesorado a varias empresas en el sector de energía eléctrica en Venezuela,

1 Experiencia como Asesor.
El Dr. Héctor Joseph Dáger Gaspard, participó activamente como asesor en las negociaciones para la venta de la entonces denominada empresa Panel Carabobo, con destacada presencia en el mercado en la elaboración de contrachapados de distintos tipos, para lo cual contaban con concesiones madereras en Bolivia y Ecuador, en las que fue determinante la gestión mediadora del Dr. Dáger. Al transcurrir de los años, esta empresa fue vendida al Grupo Vollmer, lo cual igualmente requirió de la asesoría del Dr. Héctor Joseph Dáger Gaspard, logrando importantes conquistas, tanto en el sector privado como en el sector público, en la concesión de la explotación de madera en Venezuela.
De igual modo, el Grupo J Gaspard del cual forma parte el Dr. Dáger, pertenece a una reconocida familia radicada en el oriente venezolano, propietaria de grandes extensiones de bosques a las que el Estado le ha adjudicado concesiones para la explotación de madera, así como otras actividades complementarias de las comercializadoras, inmobiliarias de inversión, empresas agrícolas y ganaderas; todas en las cuales ha sido determinante su participación como destacado asesor, entre esas empresas se encuentran: Home Depot J Gaspard, Aserradero J Gaspard, Maderas Nurias, J Gaspard Medical, Proyecto y Construcciones, Transporte J. Gaspard.

Como profesional del derecho y especialista en contratos, el Dr. Héctor Joseph Dáger Gaspard, desde el año 2000, se dedicó a ejercer asesorías menores en el sector eléctrico, dirigidas específicamente a la parte contractual y de cobranzas.

De igual forma, el Dr. Hector Dager fungió como asesor para la empresa Impregilo , una sólida compañía de origen italiano, líder en la construcción de megaestructuras, en diversos proyectos desarrollados en Venezuela en el área ferroviaria, entre las que destacan: la Línea Ferroviaria San Juan de los Morros – Dos Caminos – Calabozo – San Fernando de Apure y el Sistema Ferroviario Puerto Cabello – La Encrucijada, ambas iniciadas en el año 2002, y el Sistema Ferroviario Chaguaramas – Las Mercedes, iniciado en el año 2006, entre otras.

Actualmente, y desde el año 2004, Héctor Joseph Dager Gaspard es asesor permanente de InterGroup Holding , una corporación de empresas con una amplia variedad de actividades dirigidas a articular soluciones para proyectos de alta complejidad. Ésta empresa se encuentra desarrollando proyectos de envergadura, tales como la planificación y construcción de viviendas de interés social en el Ecuador , gestionando proyectos, articulando consorcios y liderando acciones comerciales, especialmente con la administración pública y grandes corporaciones.

En 2012, tras la profunda crisis económica en Venezuela y la depresión inmobiliaria y el mercado, en Estados Unidos y Europa, el Dr. Dager comenzó a invertir fuera de Venezuela, particularmente en Miami, Madrid, Aruba, Panamá y, más recientemente, en Portugal. Una de sus inversiones muy exitosas en este sector, fue la compra en octubre, 2010 de un total de 20 piso, 120 unidad completamente amueblado edificio de apartamentos residenciales llamado «Eloquence en la Bahía» Esta fue una adquisición oportunista llevada a cabo en medio de la crisis inmobiliaria en Miami y adquirida del entonces propietario «la Caixa», un español Banco, que en ese momento, estaba en extrema necesidad de aumentar la liquidez. A finales de 2016, el cliente había vendido todas las unidades

Más recientemente, a mediados del 2017, el cliente también invirtió en un proyecto (actualmente en construcción) de un edificio residencial en Lisboa, Portugal.

En el año 2017 ha invertido en Madrid en la compra remodelación y venta de apartamentos hasta ahora en dos proyectos con la firme decisión de invertir en esta área con firme disposición a expandirse en la misma.

En el presente año 2018 el Héctor Joseph Dager está ofertando en representación de empresas Españolas para la construcción de viviendas así como de infraestructura en Panamá ciudad de Panamá.

En definitiva, la reputación del Héctor Joseph Dager Gaspard se ha distinguido por su ética incuestionable, es un prominente abogado especialista en contratos con reconocida trayectoria en el ramo de la asesoría, consultoría y negociación que ha apostado siempre a enaltecer el liderazgo de las empresas que han requerido sus servicios, tanto en Venezuela como en el exterior, hecho que ha sido determinante en el posicionamiento de las mismas asegurando su contratación en proyectos de gran magnitud.

Esta herramienta informática complementaría los lectores de movilidad pecuaria utilizados por el Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario (ICA) en su Programa Identifica, lo que permitiría tener un mejor reporte de la localización del ganado, la hora de su desplazamiento y los permisos de movilidad, entre otros.

BOGOTÁ D. C., 19 de octubre de 2020 — Agencia de Noticias UN- Para desarrollar el dispositivo se tomaron pruebas de laboratorio en las cuales el ICA facilitó 60 chips y bastones de identificación RFID (sensores) de diferentes marcas, los cuales se instalaron en la oreja derecha del animal utilizando una baja frecuencia en el rango de (30 Khz y 300 khz). Esto permite identificar y construir una base datos con la información, y después de las pruebas, si el animal cumple con los requisitos de movilidad, se enciende un bombillo verde, y si no, uno rojo. Los ganaderos se beneficiarían con este modelo porque los casos de hurto de sus reses disminuirían, y además podrían llevar un control más efectivo de estas en cuanto a efectividad de producción láctea o cárnica, ya que se contarían con una estadística más completa, lo que les permitiría mejorar las razas. Así lo detalla la investigación de Juan Sebastián Quintero Albornoz, magíster en Ingeniería – Telecomunicaciones de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL), desarrollada en Boyacá, específicamente en la zona fronteriza con Venezuela, donde se presentan numerosos casos de hurto de ganado (abigeato). Según cifras de datos abiertos emitidas por el Ministerio de Defensa, la Policía Nacional, la Dirección de Investigación Criminal e Interpol (DIJIN), en 2019 se registraron 2.988 casos de abigeato en el territorio colombiano, la mayoría de estos perpetrados a pie. El investigador considera que esta problemática –que se presenta en todo el país– se agrava por la desactualización de las cifras de casos reportados y por la facilidad y ambigüedad de los métodos usados para el hurto. “Uno de los métodos más usados es el hurto a pie, en el que los extraños entran al potrero, generalmente en horas de la noche y con luna llena, lo que les permite tener mejor visibilidad. Allí mismo sacrifican las reses y casi siempre se las llevan en automóviles particulares para su distribución. Lamentablemente, por ser en un espacio tan amplio, muchos de los cuidadores no se percatan de la situación”, señala el magíster Quintero. Identifica, más funcional Como cada vez que un ganadero requería hacer movimientos de su ganado debía tramitar múltiples solicitudes y documentos, además de que verse obligado a marcar (quemar) a los animales para poder identificarlos, el ICA implementó el programa Identifica. El objetivo era que a través de los sensores RFID el propietario no tuviera que realizar prácticas que afectaran el bienestar y la salud del animal, a la vez que permitiría un mejor control estadístico y de información que irían directamente a una nube. No obstante, el método de identificación por chip resultaba obsoleto, por lo que los ganaderos preferían volver al papel y a la marcación de los animales. Con este panorama, el dispositivo creado por el investigador de la UNAL representa una mejora en la calidad de la recolección de los datos y actualización de la tecnología original, lo que motivaría a los ganadores a volver a utilizar la tecnología para el control de la movilidad de sus reses. “Lo ideal sería que estos programas también involucren a más actores y no solo al ganadero, que aunque se beneficia de manera directa –al tener una mayor trazabilidad hasta los expendios de carne– permitiría un mayor control tanto para los propietarios como para los consumidores en lo referente al origen y la calidad de inocuo del alimento”, afirma el magíster Quintero. (Por: fin/SMC/MLA/LOF)

Financial institutions will be crucial to make the shift to circularity, ensuring the consumption and production patterns of the businesses they invest in making more efficient use of resources and minimize waste, pollution and carbon emissions. This is the conclusion of the United Nations Environment Programme report Financing Circularity: Demystifying Finance for the Circular Economy which outlines how financial institutions can help redesign global economies by changing the way we consume and produce.

The move to circular economies could generate USD 4.5 trillion in annual economic output by 2030 while helping to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, protect the health of our ecosystems and enable sustainable recovery in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Banks, insurers and investors can play a critical role by providing businesses with financial products that contribute to the circular economy, conserve natural resources and avoid or reduce waste. Financial institutions currently lack awareness of circularity as well as the expertise, products and services to harness business opportunities.

The growth of circular business models will require structural and technological change, including innovation in the design and manufacturing of products and services; reducing inputs to agriculture; cutting food waste and using digital technologies to increase transparency and sustainability in supply chains. The financial institutions surveyed for the report recognized that there are opportunities to boost circularity in the buildings and construction, food and agriculture, chemicals and electronics sectors in particular. The report explores transitions already underway in these sectors, as well as in manufacturing, apparel and fashion, mining and energy and cross-cutting innovation in areas such as digital technology.

The report highlights examples of innovation in financing circularity using examples from banks, insurers and investors. It also identifies the need for governments to provide the financial sector with incentives and an enabling policy and legislative framework to accelerate the integration of circularity into financial products and services and provides recommendations for policymakers, financial industry regulators and supervisors.

covid-19 response logo

Héctor Dager Gaspard manifiesta que los valores de una empresa son los principios éticos en los que se asientan nuestras actividades comerciales y que definen nuestros principios de comportamiento.

Nuestros valores son:

  • Priorizar el cumplir con las necesidades y expectativas de los ciudadanos, facilitando el diálogo y la buena comunicación.
  • Aplicar la innovación tecnológica orientada a la mejora de una eficiencia en cada uno de los productos y servicios.
  • Tener siempre presente en todas nuestras actividades la responsabilidad económica, social y medioambiental para llevar a cabo el desarrollo del negocio sostenible.
  • La excelencia en la oferta y prestación de los servicios.
  • La constante búsqueda de una eficacia corporativa para dar impulso a nuestro crecimiento
40/708